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When did people become more concerned with fact than with truth? The truth is the story behind the facts … stories are living, breathing things that creative power that is at work between the teller and the listener is very real.
Gayle Ross, Cherokee
Resources
Red Wind collected a variety of resources that may be helpful to you. These include files for download, archived webinars, websites, and more.
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Creating Sister Space
A Guide for Developing Tribal Shelter and Transitional Housing Programs
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“There’s a recognition that power comes from within. It comes from having knowledge and vision. The sun has power. The wind has power. We have the power to bring forth and nurture new life. That’s the power Mother Earth has. There’s the power of love.” (Washinawatok, 1995)
Shelter and Transitional Housing is an important response to safety and provides options for women who are seeking safety following domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking or dating violence. No one size fits any community. There are some basic ideas about the intent of shelter and transitional housing responses, yet our indigenous identity will go a long way to shaping what a shelter or transitional housing program looks like in the community.

Creating Sister Space is available for download and will assist Tribal and Native specific programs in the development of their shelter and transitional housing program.
This project was supported by Grant No. 2010-ET-S6-K003 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this program are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.
Elder respect is part of our culture so there is increased shame when we fail.
Listening Session participant
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In many cultures, elders preserve traditions and share wisdom to help ensure community permanency and balance. Indigenous1 communities often hold elders in a unique and important social position. Elders are mothers, fathers, grandmothers, grandfathers, aunties, uncles, brothers and sisters. They are also advisors, teachers, healers, spiritual leaders and connectors to the past and future.
Despite strong traditions, tribal communities have not been immune from abuse in later life. Education about its existence, and the design of culturally meaningful interventions, remains in its early stages.
Reclaiming What is Sacred: Addressing Harm to Indigenous Elders and Developing a Tribal Response to Abuse in Later Life is the result of a collaboration between the National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life, Red Wind Consulting, Inc. and ISP Consults.
Creating a Safe Space to Grow:
A Guide for Tribal Child and Youth Advocacy
Whatever the future holds, do not forget who you are. Teach your children, teach your children's children, and then teach their children also. Teach them the pride of a great people ... A time will come again when they will celebrate together with joy. When that happens, my spirit will be there with you.
Chief Leschi, Nisqually
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In a lot of ways, Tribal Advocates are teachers. You teach individuals how to cope with trauma and access resources. You educate communities about the impact of violence. You show institutions problematic practices that create barriers. Advocacy is a multitude of activities that show support. This guidebook is intended to help Advocates in tribal communities with supportive responses to young victims of Domestic Violence, Teen Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, Stalking, and Sex Trafficking. Effective child and youth advocacy must include education and support for their unique needs. Young victims need safety, understanding, strategies to decrease the negative impact, offender accountability, and a safe space to grow.
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The poster is 17 x 11 Tabloid paper size.

There is a space for you to insert local contact information.

Teen Dating Violence Poster
available here for download.
This project is supported by Grant No. 2014-TA-AX-K047 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this program are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.