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Tribal Transitional Housing Peer Visits
Victims and survivors of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, Stalking, Sex Trafficking, and Dating Violence are on a long journey as they navigate the web of safety needs, trauma, life changing events, resources, and system responders. The violence against Native women that leads to their need for emergency shelter and Transitional Housing options comes from a history of oppression that is playing out today. The rates of violence against Native women are significantly higher than other populations of women.

Red Wind Consulting has Transitional Housing Peer Visits available to assist in creating or enhancing housing programs to offer an environment with a safe and open space that takes into consideration the needs, desires, comfort, dignity, and support of those being served.

The Peer Visit will be a one-day visit to a Transitional Housing program allowing grantees to tour a facility, meet with their staff, and learn new ideas of how other programs operate and develop strategies to complex issues. Visits will focus on learning from established Tribal Transitional Housing programs that have developed solid responses to help heal Native women and their children who are affected by violence.
WHO CAN PARTICIPATE
OVW Tribal Grantees of Consolidated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS) are able participate in Peer Visits using their OVW travel set aside funds.

Red Wind is intentionally limiting the group to eight participants to allow for in-depth conversations with the Peer Program staff.
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Sample Peer Visit
Peer Program:
American Indian Community Housing Organization
WATCH THIS SPACE FOR UPCOMING INFORMATION
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American Indian Community Housing Organization’s mission is: Honoring the resiliency of Native American people, AICHO’s vision is to strengthen our community by centering indigenous values in all aspects of our work. AICHO’s operating philosophy is that every American Indian woman and child deserves to live in a safe, non-threatening environment and should be treated with dignity and respect. The American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO) provides housing services for people suffering from long-term homelessness, and survivors of domestic abuse. 
Topics will include:
  • How to address the complicated issues that come from working with women and their children while they live in the program. Areas such as substance use and abuse, mental health issues, and family structure;
  • How to think through and plan housing responses; and
  • How to thoughtfully develop a culturally-specific response for victims.
This project is supported by Grant No. 2015-TA-AX-K069 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in any of these webinars are those of the author(s)/presenter(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.